Hospital Rock

Native American pictographs estimated at 1350. Pioneers John Swanson and James Everton were both injured at the spot giving it its unusual name. 

Hospital Rock

Amphitheater Point

Grand overlook with views of Moro Rock and the upper alpine regions of the Sierra Nevada Mountains

Sequoia Amphitheater Point

Crystal Cave

One of 240 known caves in the park. Amazing polished marble chambers and formations decorate the walls and ceilings. At a constant 48 degrees, Pleistocene era fossils and minerals are protected among stalactites and stalagmites.

Crystal Cave Sequoia

Moro Rock

350 steep steps lead to the top of this towering granite dome with views of the Great Western Divide and its peaks above 13,000 feet

Moro Rock

Tunnel Log

After falling from natural causes in 1937, this Giant Sequoia was 21 feet wide by 275 feet tall and was estimated to be more than 2,000 years old. Today vehicles can drive through this gentle giant.

Tunnel Log Sequoia

Crescent Meadow

Named the 'Gem of the Sierra' by John Muir, trails wind along this perfect meadow which provides necessary habitat to keep the gentle giants alive. This pristine alpine sight will leave you breathless.

Crescent Meadow

Tharp's Log

Led by the Yokuts Native Americans, Hale Tharp was the first modern pioneer to discover the Giant Forest. He lived in this log 'cabin' in the summertime from 1861 to 1890, the year the park was established.

Tharps Log

Log Meadow

Adjacent to his house log, this meadows was the perfect spot for Tharp to raise his cattle

Log Meadow

Beetle Rock

Short walk from the Giant Forest Museum that provides sweeping views of the Sierra Nevada foothills

Beetle Rock Sequoia

Giant Forest Museum

Museum revealing the history of Giant Sequoias in a historic Market lodge on the National Register of Historic Places

Giant Forest Museum

Big Trees Trail / Round Meadow

Easy 2/3 mile walk. With its towering giant sequoias and lush green meadows, it is the perfect way to immerse yourself in the Giant Forest.

Big Trees Trail Round Meadow

General Sherman Tree

The World's Largest Tree. Estimated to be an age of 2,300-2,700 years old, it is also one of the longest lived trees on Earth. This Gigantic Sequoia Tree is 274.9 feet tall with a ground circumference of 102.6 feet. The diameter of its largest branch measures 6.8 feet.

General Sherman Tree

Chief Sequoyah

Named after the famous Native American who created a complete Cherokee alphabet and writing system to document his tribe's history. Giant Sequoia's also derive their name from Chief Sequoyah.

Chief Sequoyah

Congress Trail

Starting at the General Sherman Tree, the largest tree on Earth, the trail winds through impressive groves of some of the largest sequoia's in the park. Names like 'The President', 'The House' and 'The Senate' strands give the trail its name. Crowds get smaller the further you hike on the easy 3 mile loop which can be done in varying lengths.

Congress Trail

The President

Third largest tree in the world by volume and oldest sequoia at 3,200 years old. Named in memory of President Warren G. Harding in 1923.

The President Sequoia

The House

Dense stand of Sequoia Trees named after The House of Representatives along the Congress Trail

The House Sequoia

The Senate

Dense stand of Sequoia Trees named after The Senate along the Congress Trail

The Senate Sequoia

Founders Group

Named for the pioneers who helped create Sequoia National Park

Founders Group

Lincoln Tree

One of the most impressive Sequoia trees and estimated to be the 4th largest tree in the world

Lincoln Tree Sequoia

Cattle Cabin

Log cabin used by early cattle pioneers. Leased to the men who provided milk and meat to visitors and park soldiers between 1891 and 1913.

Cattle Cabin Sequoia

Circle Meadow

Scenic meadow surrounded by Giant Sequoias that circles into a loop. Used by cattle during early pioneer days. 

Circle Meadow

Tokopah Falls

 Tallest waterfall in the park at 1,200 feet. A stunning 1.7 mile trail each way follows the Kaweah River up the high country of the Sierra Nevada to the base of the falls. Crowds will fade as you surround massive granite cliffs covered in pristine forest. Visit in the Spring for the most thunderous falls. 

Tokopah Falls

Lost Grove

Over 400 magnificent Giant Sequoias on the edge of the park that provides seclusion from the popular Giant Forest. Get lost and enjoy solitude in this peaceful grove.

Lost Grove

Generals Highway

Scenic drive that connects Sequoia with Kings Canyon. Named after the two largest trees in the world, General Sherman & General Grant. Dedicated on June 23, 1935 that welcomed 669 cars with 2,488 people

Generals Highway