Would You Enjoy a Trip to Hell?...You Might Enjoy a Trip to Death Valley, Now! It has all the advantages of hell without the inconveniences.” -1907 April Fools Day Newspaper Ad

Aguereberry Point

6,433 foot vista overlooking the Panamint Range, Furnace Creek, Badwater and the massive valley floor itself *4 wheel drive recommended

Aguereberry Point Death Valley

Artist's Drive

9-mile drive best seen in the afternoon light and sunset when the colors are their most vibrant

Artist's Drive Death Valley

Badwater Basin

Hottest, Driest place on Earth and the lowest point in North America at 282 feet below sea level

Badwater Basin

Artist's Palette

Colorful canyon created by oixidation of iron, mica and manganese exposed from volcanic activity

Artist's Palette Death Valley

Borax Museum

Historic museum featuring the Valley's history of Borax Mining and a stunning collection of stagecoach wagons

Borax Museum

Dante's View

Best place to admire the expansive Valley at 5,475 feet. On a clear day, the highest point in the contiguous United States, Mount Whitney (14,494 feet) can be seen alongside the lowest point Badwater (-282 feet).

Dante's View

Devil's Golf Course

In 1934, the National Park Service described this as a place where 'only the devil could play golf' with its fascinating shapes of salt

Devils' Golf Course

Eureka Mine

Famous 1,612 gram Golden Nugget  displayed at the National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institute was mined here

Eureka Mine

Father Crowley Vista Point

Overlooks cinder cones and lava flows of Rainbow Canyon. Honors Father Crowley, the Padre of the Desert. He was an advocate for desert tourism and the rebirth of the Owens Valley after Los Angeles stole its water supply leaving nothing for the people to live off.

Father Crowley Vista Point

Furnace Creek Inn and Ranch Resort

Four Diamond Hotel known for its opulent luxury and beautiful suites surrounded by Palm Groves with sweeping views of the Valley. Built by the Pacific Coast Borax Company in 1927 to promote tourism after mining operations slowed. 

Furnace Creek Inn and Ranch Resort

Golden Canyon

Colorful badlands and erosional cliffs that started forming 5 million years ago from an ancient lakebed

Golden Canyon

Harmony Borax Works

Famed Borax operation from 1883-88. At its peak, it employed 40 men  and produced three tons of borax per day. 

Harmony Borax Works

Harrisburg Ghost Town

The ghostly remains of Peter Aguereberry's famous Death Valley mining camp where he lived and worked 1905-45

Harrisburg Death Valley

Hell's Gate

Dramatic intersection overlooking the Valley from Daylight Pass Road, Beatty Cutoff and Mud Canyon

Hell's Gate

Mosaic Canyon

Geologic wonderland of limestone rocks known as Noonday Dolomite which formed 750 to 900 millions years ago

Mosaic Canyon

Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes

Best seen before Sunrise and during Sunset when shadows dance and light paints the dunes

Mesquite Flat Sand Dunes

Mushroom Rock

Remnants of a once iconic stop in the park resembling a mushroom eroded out of basalt

Mushroom Rock

Panamint Valley

Wide basin valley surrounded by rugged canyons, sand dunes and Joshua Trees

Panamint Valley

Rhyolite

Ghost town founded in 1904 with electricity, water, telephones, a hospital, a school, stock exchange and even an opera house. Completely abandoned by 1920 when mining ended.

Rhyolite

Stovepipe Well

Only known water source for those crossing the Valley during the Gold Rush

Historic Stovepipe Well

Scotty's Castle

Mission/Spanish Colonial Revival architectural wonder created with the vision of Walter E. Scott, famous gold mine con man. Walter convinced Chicago investor Albert Mussey Johnson to invest in his fake mine. The investment turned out to be a fraud but Albert enjoyed Scott's enthusiasm and constructed the property anyway. *Closed for repairs until 2019

Scotty's Castle

Ubehebe Crater

Half mile volcanic crater created by a steam and gas explosion caused by rising magma touching ground water. Research has estimated it could have occurred less than 1,000 years ago making it very young in geologic terms. Timbisha Shoshone Native Americans called the crater 'Tem-pin-tta- Wo’sah' which translates to 'coyote's basket'.

Ubehebe Crater

Twenty Mule Team Canyon

Beautiful drive with colorful badlands and eroded cliffs named after the famous 'Twenty Mule Team' of 18 mules and 2 horses who hauled borax in wagons out of Death Valley between 1883 to 1889

Twenty Mule Team Canyon

Zabriskie Point

Geologic badlands and cliffs formed 5 million years ago from an ancient lakebed. The vista was named after Christian Brevoort Zabriskie, manager of the famous Pacific Coast Borax Company.

Zabriskie Point