Canyon de Chelly National Monument celebrates the Native American history of Ancestral Puebloans and Navajo. It is the only National Park jointly managed by the National Park Service and the Navajo Nation. The canyon is still used today for farming and the echoes of sheep can still be seen and heard. A Navajo guide is required to explore the canyon itself but many overlooks can be enjoyed by all. For those who have the day to explore, follow this guide from North to South as you explore the mystical wonders of this timeless landscape. 

Massacre Cave Overlook

Site of massacre between Najavo and Spanish soldiers in 1805. Named 'Adan Aho'doo'nili' (Two Fell Off) after a brave Navajo woman fought off a soldier

Massacre Cave Overlook

Yucca Cave Ruin

Small ruin along the walls of Canyon del Muerto

Yucca Cave Ruin

Mummy Cave Overlook

An 1880 expedition discovered two well-preserved mummies at these ruins. Named by Navajo 'Tséyaa Kini' (House Under the Rock).

Mummy Cave Overlook

Antelope House Overlook

Expansive view of Canyon del Muerto and Antelope House Ruin along the valley floor

Antelope House Overlook

Tunnel Overlook

A view revealing a grand entrance into the canyon

Tunnel Overlook

Tsegi Overlook

'Tséyi' (Rock Canyon) provides sweeping views of Canyon de Chelly

Tsegi Overlook

Junction Overlook

Stunning overlook where Canyon del Muerto meets Canyon de Chelly

Junction Overlook

White House Overlook

Towering view of White House Ruin

White House Overlook

White House Trail

2.5 mile out and back trail to the impressive White House Ruins. The only trail into the canyon that can be done without a Navajo guide.

White House Trail

White House Ruin

Impressive ruins of a once thriving Ancestral Puebloan 80-room complex used between 750-1300

White House Ruin

Sliding House Overlook

Steep overlook with views of ruins built on a slope

Sliding House Overlook

Face Rock Overlook

700 foot drop-off with impressive valley curves

Face Rock Overlook

Spider Rock Overlook

The most famous and last stop in Canyon de Chelly is this grand 800 foot spire. The Navajo named the rock after 'Na'ashjéii Asdzáá' (Spider Woman), teacher and restorer of harmony to the world.

Spider Rock
Navajo Rug